Tag Archives: screenwriter

Shroud is Released

2013Shroud-8

Shroud was written and directed by David Jetre and produced by Edgar Pitts.

The film stars Nicole Leigh Jones, G. Russell Reynolds, Morgana Shaw, Charles Baker, Larry Jack Dotson, Chad Briley, Dylan Barth and Jodie Moore.

Read the unabridged version of the script here: http://sandmerrick.com/Shroud.pdf

Victoria Celestine (Nicole Leigh Jones) braves a transatlantic journey from Holland to America to search for her missing husband. Accompanied by her young brother Abraham she discovers Shroud—a ghost town deep in the Arizona Territory. There she unravels a conspiracy involving a misplaced Mayor (G. Russell Reynolds), his wife (Morgana Shaw), a renegade marshal (Jodie Moore) and his posse of cruel Confederate defectors.

With history wrapped in superstition and murders masked by myth, Lady Celestine reveals the grisly secret of a dead Spanish Conquistador, a heretic hanged, and the 300-year old Apache legend of an abomination that feeds on innocence.

Production Company: Jetrefilm Entertainment (www.Jetrefilm.com)
Format: NTSC, Dolby, Subtitled
Subtitles: English Rated:
Unrated Run Time: 101 minutes
Average Customer Review: ★★★★☆ (4 out of 5 stars)

Available on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AAJ1MR6

Available on iTunes: Soon

David Jetre
Writer | Producer | Director | Designer
flickr | twitter | www.sandmerrick.com | www.jetrefilm.com

Shroud DVD Sleeve for Amazon.com

Shroud DVD Sleeve

The final DVD sleeve for Jetrefilm Entertainment’s gothic western film Shroud.

Shroud stars Nicole Leigh Jones, G. Russell Reynolds, Charles Baker, Morgana Shaw, Dylan Barth, Larry Jack Dotson, Chad Briley, Jodie More, and Donnie Blanz.

Follow this link to Buy Shroud DVD on Amazon.

Modular Writing is for Hacks

Modular writing is a scriptwriting style whereby no scene necessarily connects to one before or after it.

With modular writing the only way you can tell if a sequence comes before or after another one is by its position in the plot, its page in the script.

Genuine writing—that is, the writing of professional and literate men and women—constantly braids predicates, subtle thematic alliterations, afterthoughts, affirmations and denials, and other elliptical devices into a script in order to allow a compounding dramatic pulse and momentum to develop through the story.

Recent scripts like Star Trek, Transformers 2: Revenge of the Fallen, and Clash of the Titans are Exhibits A, B and C in the criminal prosecution of modular writing. Cloddish, confusing and infantile, these scripts display a rare incompetence that is sadly more the rule than the exceptions.

Sadly, each year the bar gets lowered.

This mean-spirited industry trend of demeaning legitimate dialog, mature evaluations, and honest conflicts for played-out soundbites and one-liners will not be corrected on the studio side of the scales.

It is up to intelligent, clever and ambitious writers to hold on to their skills long enough to infuse the stale screenwriting world with new ideas, original dialog and exciting new interpretations of the classic dramatic tale.

Write deeply.  Tangle and entwine.  Write for thinking men and women, not grown-up adolescents.  The flickering literacy and faded minds of men in high places must be reminded of the power of the writer.