Tag Archives: David Jetre

Vangelis Concept Poster (Script #35)

2013 Vangelis Poster

Revised concept poster for my high fantasy war film Vangelis.

In the mythical kingdom of Nymiria a damned sorcerer abrogates an ancient covenant and turns the power of a magic artifact against his own people.

Actress Grace Holley shown.
Armor by Patrick Thaden & Ugo Serrano.
Photography by Bryan Chatlien.

Vangelis (© 2015 David Jetre. All Rights Reserved.)

FWWeekly: David Jetre Unveils Shroud

Jetrefilm Entertainment is an independent film

My interview with Kristian Lin of the Fort Worth Weekly.

March 6, 2013

“We didn’t want to sell when we were desperate,” said Denton native David Jetre about his debut film, Shroud. The supernatural Western wrapped in 2009, when the country was in the depths of a major recession. With his film financed by himself and close friends, he could afford to wait until he could distribute the movie on his own terms. Last month, he made it available for purchase online, with iTunes and Blu-Ray releases coming up in the next few weeks. “Reselling portals like Amazon, iTunes, and the Google Play Store make this an ideal time,” he said.

Jetre (his last name pronounced jee-ter), who says he’s “over 40,” came to filmmaking from a background as creative director of the design firm Sandmerrick, Inc. The firm was originally established in 2000 under the name Studio 930 Intermedia, with Jetre hanging out his own shingle after working for various North Texas agencies designing everything from websites to business cards. In 2010, he changed his firm’s name. “We found there were too many clients mistaking us for a photography studio,” he said, adding that photography is only a small part of his business, along with shooting TV commercials and laying out magazines.

Making a film was a natural decision for someone who had spent his life in creative businesses, especially with his background in TV commercials. “It was a one-to-one transition,” he said. “I had already worked with lots of video and audio crews. It was just about telling a story over two hours instead of 30 seconds.”

He wrote the script for Shroud over “15 lattes” at a Barnes & Noble in Lewisville in late 2007. Wanting something to be shot immediately, he reasoned, “I live in Texas, let’s do a Western,” coming up with the story of a Dutch woman in the 1860s who tracks her disappeared husband’s whereabouts to a ghost town in Arizona.

Serving as writer-director, producer, production designer, editor, and fight choreographer, Jetre shot much of the film’s exterior footage in “Willieville,” the Western town built outside of Austin for the 1986 Willie Nelson film Red Headed Stranger. However, he couldn’t use any of the interiors there, since many of the buildings have been turned into museums devoted to Nelson. Instead, he shot the indoor scenes in various Victorian mansions in Fort Worth and Weatherford. “We scouted about 15 homes,” he said. “The owners were all very welcoming.”

The biggest hiccup came when his lead actress Nicole Leigh (billed in the credits as Nicole Leigh Jones) revealed she was four months pregnant, midway through the shoot. “We had her outdoors in November wearing a metal suit of armor, which was like a refrigerator, and she was being thrown around” in a climactic fight scene, he recalled.

Jetre shut down production for six months, which wasn’t a problem with his investors. In fact, the delay allowed him to rework some action scenes and recast a major role with a better actor. “It all worked out in the end,” he said.

He acknowledges continuity problems in the story, caused by the loss of some scenes to technical problems, but he’s proud of his work on the film’s visual side. Indeed, despite its opaque dialogue and some amateurish acting from the supporting ranks, the movie is a handsome period piece that looks far more expensive than its $150,000 budget. Still, he’s not eager to repeat the experience. “On my next movie, I’m going to have an art department,” he said. “I don’t want to wear so many hats.”

He clearly loves the creative decisions that go into the filmmaking process. “Pre-production is where a movie is made or broken,” he said. “Accidents will happen, but having everything planned out just helps so much.”

My appreciation to both Kristian Lin and the Fort Worth Weekly for this inaugural review of my first film.

The original article can be read here: http://goo.gl/f8wGEW

The Rule for DVD Cover Art

If your cover art is bigger than your movie go with what everyone else tells you to.

If your film is bigger than your cover art…

Honestly? Go with whatever you want.

The whole ‘judge a DVD by the cover’ crowd are the very people who have devastated the film industry of any quality storytelling. Your DVD cover should be a tease not an explanation. If your movie can be summed up by a single picture on a cover you are in the wrong business, my friend. Film is too big for you. You should settle on simple photography. It is called moving or motion pictures for a reason.

These critics are guilty of lesser choices. Want to be average? Want to be like everyone else making trash? Do what they say.

Otherwise stand up, stand out, and stand for something new and different.

The failed artist, writer, producer, actor, and director fall into the old snare of criticizing what they don’t understand and can never produce themselves.

The uncreative have no authority over the creative.

Those who cannot dream have no right to tell the rest of us to wake up.

Shroud is Released

2013Shroud-8

Shroud was written and directed by David Jetre and produced by Edgar Pitts.

The film stars Nicole Leigh Jones, G. Russell Reynolds, Morgana Shaw, Charles Baker, Larry Jack Dotson, Chad Briley, Dylan Barth and Jodie Moore.

Read the unabridged version of the script here: http://sandmerrick.com/Shroud.pdf

Victoria Celestine (Nicole Leigh Jones) braves a transatlantic journey from Holland to America to search for her missing husband. Accompanied by her young brother Abraham she discovers Shroud—a ghost town deep in the Arizona Territory. There she unravels a conspiracy involving a misplaced Mayor (G. Russell Reynolds), his wife (Morgana Shaw), a renegade marshal (Jodie Moore) and his posse of cruel Confederate defectors.

With history wrapped in superstition and murders masked by myth, Lady Celestine reveals the grisly secret of a dead Spanish Conquistador, a heretic hanged, and the 300-year old Apache legend of an abomination that feeds on innocence.

Production Company: Jetrefilm Entertainment (www.Jetrefilm.com)
Format: NTSC, Dolby, Subtitled
Subtitles: English Rated:
Unrated Run Time: 101 minutes
Average Customer Review: ★★★★☆ (4 out of 5 stars)

Available on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AAJ1MR6

Available on iTunes: Soon

David Jetre
Writer | Producer | Director | Designer
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